Adobe announces Adobe Line, Sketch iPad apps, along with the ‘Ink’ stylus and ‘Slide’ ruler

 ipad  Comments Off on Adobe announces Adobe Line, Sketch iPad apps, along with the ‘Ink’ stylus and ‘Slide’ ruler
Jun 182014
 

Adobe has announced new iOS apps along with their “Ink” digital pen and “Slide” digital ruler. Adobe paired up with Adonit to create the new hardware which will be shipping with new software for iPad that includes Adobe Sketch, Adobe Line, and Photoshop Mix. Continue reading »

Create animated video stories with Adobe Voice App for iPad [VIDEO]

 Apps  Comments Off on Create animated video stories with Adobe Voice App for iPad [VIDEO]
May 082014
 

Adobe Voice app for iPad has been announced, this app allows users to dream up and create animated videos with voice, photos, icons and your own sound effects.

The app has different templates to choose from making it easy and simple to use. Once you are finished making a video you can then share with friends on common social media networks. Continue reading »

Steve Jobs Was Right About Flash All Along, Adobe Stops Development On Mobile Browser Flash

 News  Comments Off on Steve Jobs Was Right About Flash All Along, Adobe Stops Development On Mobile Browser Flash
Nov 092011
 

According to a report published earlier today, Adobe will be pulling support for Flash on browsers for mobile devices.


(via Tumblr)

Continue reading »

Adobe Flash Media Server 4.5 Will Finally Bring Flash To iPhone, iPad And iPod touch

 Apple, Apps  Comments Off on Adobe Flash Media Server 4.5 Will Finally Bring Flash To iPhone, iPad And iPod touch
Sep 092011
 

If you own an iOS device, the greatest roadblock to browsing the web you’ve ever run into has been Apple’s insistence not to build in native support for Adobe Flash, citing performance issues that the plugin would cause. While today’s development doesn’t change Apple’s stance, Adobe has developed a new technology that could, 4 years later, finally bring Flash content to all iOS devices, namely; iPhone, iPad and iPod touch.

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Flash Sometimes Works And Sometimes Doesn’t On HTC EVO 4G

 Apple, News  Comments Off on Flash Sometimes Works And Sometimes Doesn’t On HTC EVO 4G
Jun 192010
 

We have seen a lot of public discussion in the past over Apple’s decision to not allow Flash on the iOS platform. While several users have questioned Apple’s decision, Steve Jobs has maintained that the multimedia platform degrades performance and ruins battery life.

Steve Jobs’ statements against Flash have been severely challenged by Adobe executives. However, the consensus among industry observers has been that Flash may still not be completely ready for the mobile platform.

Continue reading »

May 052010
 

Adobe CTO Kevin Lynch says Flash works just fine on the Apple iPhone, thank you very much — and he thinks that’s exactly why Apple keeps on denying it access. Speaking at the Web 2.0 Expo in San Francisco, he explained his belief that by eliminating Flash, Cupertino is forcing developers to build apps natively for iPhone OS rather than one of Adobe’s cross-platform solutions, and thus creating a “walled garden” of applications that users must flock to an iDevice to be able to use.

Continue reading »

Flash Support For iPhone ?

 Apple, ipad, iphone, News  Comments Off on Flash Support For iPhone ?
Apr 292010
 

iphone-flash

Adobe recently announced that it has stopped working on Flash for iPhone, which caused some uproar among iPhone users.

Steve Jobs has posted an open letter on Apple’s website offering his “Thoughts on Flash”. It is a must-read to find out the reason for not allowing Flash on the iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch.

Steve Jobs has provided six reasons for not allowing Flash on its iPhone OS devices.

Open Standards:

Continue reading »

Adobe Executive Kevin Lynch Discusses Flash on Mac, iPhone, and iPad

 News  Comments Off on Adobe Executive Kevin Lynch Discusses Flash on Mac, iPhone, and iPad
Feb 172010
 

BoomTown today sat down with Adobe Chief Technical Officer Kevin Lynch to discuss the relationship between Apple and Adobe and the deployment of Flash on Mac as well as the iPhone and iPad. Apple’s decision not to include Flash Player capabilities on the iPhone and now the iPad has resulted in apparent tensions between the two companies.

Lynch’s comments about Flash on the Mac indicate that the Adobe is working hard on CPU usage during video rendering, acknowledging that such tasks use more CPU cycles on the Mac than on Windows. Regarding the iPhone, Lynch defends the importance of Flash on the Web, noting that he is hopeful that the adoption of Flash capabilities on a number of smartphone platforms will help convince others such as Apple to follow suit.

Well, there’s a lot of Flash content on the Web, and so, right now about 85% of the top websites have Flash on their website. So if you want to view the whole Web, not having the ability to view Flash really is kind of limiting in terms of the experience on the devices, and so we’re really focused on making sure that we can bring the ability to view Flash content and interact with it across all of these devices…I’m hopeful in the smartphone space, for example, that as people start to see that you can get a great experience with Flash in the smartphone, for example on Android, and Palm, and Nokia, and RIM, and these other devices, that that will encourage others to adopt Flash as well on their devices.

In the interview, Lynch also discusses Adobe’s efforts on its AIR platform, which bundles the Flash runtime into applications, allowing developers to easily port their applications to a variety of platforms, including the iPhone.

[via macrumors]

Is Adobe Trying To Sabotage HTML5 Open Specification

 iphone, News  Comments Off on Is Adobe Trying To Sabotage HTML5 Open Specification
Feb 152010
 

iphone-flash

The lack of support to Flash on the iPhone OS devices has been a very contentious issue for quite some time and the debate is back in the limelight ever since Apple unveiled the iPad which, like the iPhone, does not support Flash.

Steve Jobs has always maintained that Flash is a “buggy” piece of software and the company is looking at HTML5 as an alternate platform to support multimedia applications.

Earlier this month, Adobe CTO Kevin Lynch countered Steve Jobs’ statements insisting upon the ubiquity of his company’s software. Lynch claimed that nearly 85% of the top websites in the world and 98% of computers employed Flash; implying that Apple was denying its users the best experience by not offering support to Flash.

Though Adobe has constantly backed the capabilities of their multimedia software, the company has also lent its support all along to the HTML5 platform asserting that the future will see Flash co-existing with HTML5 rather than one platform outdoing the other. In a discussion last year, Shantanu Narayen, the CEO at Adobe said:

“To the extent that an improved HTML standard accelerates innovation and consistent reach for web content, we’re very supportive.”

Despite all the lip service in support of HTML5, it now appears that Adobe could be acting to sabotage the growth of the open specification. According to Ian Hixie, a member of the HTML5 working group, the company has objected to the latest publication of HTML5 without specifying the reasons behind it. On his blog, Hixie writes

“Larry Masinter, Adobe, quoted in the minutes of yesterday’s weekly phone status report for the HTML working group: do I need to repeat objections?

Net result: the latest publication of HTML5 is now blocked by Adobe, via an objection that has still not been made public (despite yesterday’s promise to make it so).”

As folks at Apple Insider note, the reasons behind this are not hard to see. The canvas element of HTML5 supports the creation of rich media ads and games that could directly compete with Flash. However, it could still be premature to blame the company. We are waiting for an official response from Adobe regarding these accusations and will update you as and when that happens.

Update:

Adobe’s Larry Masinter claims that Adobe is not blocking anything related to HTML5. He commented on 9 to 5 Mac’s blog:

No part of HTML5 is, or was ever, “blocked” in the W3C HTML Working Group — not HTML5, not Canvas 2D Graphics, not Microdata, not Video — not by me, not by Adobe.

Neither Adobe nor I oppose, are fighting, are trying to stop, slow down, hinder, oppose, or harm HTML5, Canvas 2D Graphics, Microdata, video in HTML, or any of the other significant features in HTML5.

Claims otherwise are false. Any other disclaimers needed?

So that should put the speculation to rest.

[Ian Hixie Blog via Apple Insider]